Warning: DO NOT OVER INFLATE the pressure cuff. Severe damage to major blood vessels, capillaries, and nerves is possible. Never exceed an inflation pressure in excess of 30 mmHg over expected systolic pressure. For an average teenager, a systolic pressure of 110 mmHg is expected.


The Pressure Cuff must be inflated to at least 110mmhg for the readings to be taken correctly.


Read the operating instructions carefully before use. 


The cuff supplied is a universal cuff. When wrapped around the arm it should be tight before inflation, but not so tight that it is already creating restrictions of blood flow. 


It is normal practice to use the tube of the cuff to align the cuff. When correctly positioned, the tube should run down in a straight line along the inner lower arm and go between the natural split of the fingers with palm open.  


When sharing a pressure cuff, it is good practice to clean the surface of the cuff that contacts the skin between measurements. Alternatively, clean the skin contact area before and after use.  


The sensor is not waterproof. It may be cleaned using a damp cloth. Do not immerse in water or detergent. Do not place the sensor in an environment in which high humidity levels are possible as this may result in damage or malfunction. 


Blood pressure instructions: 

While taking blood pressure can be an individual process, it is easier to have the assistance of another person. 


For all blood pressure measurements, to get the most accurate results it is important to have the user sit down for a few minutes before having their blood pressure taken. They must be resting and not move during the measurement process. 


All readings from this apparatus are indicative and not absolute; the apparatus is not medical grade or certified.  


Blood pressure readings can be determined in EasySense2 by three methods. Automated where all the calculations are conducted without user intervention, and Manual where the raw data is shown, and the user calculates the data.  

Automated approach: 


  1. Attach the tube from the cuff to the Blood Pressure Sensor 
  2. Position the cuff on arm: 
    1. Ensure the cuff is fully deflated. Open the valve on the pump bulb slightly if air needs to escape. 
    2. Make sure you have minimal clothing over the arm to be used (for example shirt sleeve only not shirt and jumper). Some improvement will be seen if the cuff is placed directly to skin. 
    3. Wrap the cuff around the arm so the middle of the cuff is over the brachial artery. You may need assistance for this. 
    4. Position the cuff approximately 2.5cm above the elbow with the arrow on the cuff above the brachial artery.  
    5. Close the valve. 
  3. Turn on the Wireless Blood Pressure sensor and connect the blood pressure sensor to EasySense2.
  4. By default, the following ranges are turned on - this is what you need for the automated blood pressure method: See image 1.0 below
  5. In EasySense2, change the layout to two charts. On the top left of one of the new charts, click on the "?" symbol and select "BP". 
  6. EasySense2 will default the recording setup to an interval of 50ms and Continuous Mode.  
  7. Start recording in EasySense2. 
  8. Pump up the cuff (approximately one to two big pumps per second) until the cuff pressure is approximately 140 to 150 mmHg. The cuff pressure is shown on the graph and the number box on the far righthand side of EasySense2. 
  9. Slowly open the valve to decrease the cuff pressure. This will require a very small turn of the valve in the region of 5 to 10 degrees. The cuff should deflate at a rate of 5 to 10mmHg every 5 seconds or so, use the graph display to check the rate of deflation. 
  10. The experiment will automatically end once the cuff pressure gets below 35mmHg. The blood pressure results will then be displayed in the ‘BP’ chart as shown below: See image 1.1 below
  11. Multiple runs can be performed by simply pressing Start again. 

Image 1.0


Image 1.2


Manual approach (gives an understanding of how an automated blood pressure monitor works): 


  1. Follow instructions form the Automated section for fitting the cuff and installing the sensor. 
  2. Connect the Blood Pressure Sensor to EasySense2. 
  3. In Devices, turn on both pulse ranges in the devices menu. The Blood pressure and Heart Rate ranges should be turned off. See image 2.0 below
  4. The default setting of EasySense 2 for a single panel with a graph is required. 
  5. EasySense2 will default the recording setup to an interval of 50ms and Continuous Mode. For this experiment, it is best to use setup to change the sampling interval to 10ms although it will still work at the 50ms default. 
  6. Start recording in EasySense2. 
  7. Pump up the cuff (approximately one to two big pumps per second) until the cuff pressure is approximately 140 to 150 mmHg. The cuff pressure is shown on the graph and the number box on the far righthand side of EasySense2. 
  8. Slowly open the valve to decrease the cuff pressure. This will require a very small turn of the valve in the region of 5 to 10 degrees. The cuff should deflate at a rate of 5 to 10mmHg every 5 seconds or so. 
  9. The experiment will automatically end once the cuff pressure gets to below 35mmHg. Results similar to those below will be recorded: See image 2.1 below
  10. Use the Data Selection tool (Tools -> Select Data) to select just the portion when the green ‘Pulse Amplitude’ data is plotted – i.e. between about 10s and 50s. See image 2.2 below
  11. Meaning of the signals: 
    1. RED = Cuff pressure. This shows the small bumps of the pulse caused by the blood flow returning to the arm. 
    2. BLUE = Pulse Waveform. This is an amplified version of just the bumps from the cuff pressure that shows more detail of the pulse and heart beats. 
    3. GREEN = Pulse Amplitude. This is the amplitude of the Pulse Waveform (i.e. from min to max). 
  12. Data analysis: 
    1. Use the Crosshair values tool to find the maximum point on the Pulse Amplitude signal. Once this is found, record this value (in the above example this is approximately 31 read off the Y axis for the green trace) and read off the corresponding Pressure from the Cuff Pressure signal. This is known as the Mean Pressure (also knows as the Mean Arterial Pressure or MAP). In this example the Mean Pressure is approximately 104mmHg.  
    2. Systolic Pressure – This is calculated as a percentage of the peak value of the Pulse Amplitude trace. Typical values for the Systolic percentage are between 55% to 70%. Each Blood pressure monitor has a different measurement method and derived percentage. Calculate the Systolic percentage of the Pulse Amplitude signal, use the Crosshair values tool to find this value to the left of the peak on the Pulse Amplitude trace and again read off the actual pressure at this point on the Cuff Pressure trace – this is the Systolic Pressure.  
      1. Example: If the max value of the green Pulse Amplitude trace is 31 and I use 70% as the Systolic percentage, then 0.70*31 = 21.7 -> find this value on the green trace to the left of the max value on pulse amplitude and read off the corresponding red Cuff Pressure at this point – in this example this equates to 128mmHg. 


    1. Diastolic Pressure – this follows the same approach as Systolic. The typical percentage range for Diastolic Pressure is 70 to 85% of the peak Pulse Amplitude. Calculate the Diastolic percentage and find this point to the right of peak on the Pulse Amplitude trace. Again, read off the cuff pressure at the point -this is the Diastolic Pressure. 
      1. Example: 75% of 31 = 23.25. This equates to a cuff pressure of 81mmHg 


    1. You will now have the Systolic/Diastolic values that are associated with Blood pressure readings. For the above example this is 128 / 81. 


Image 2.0

Image 2.2

Image 2.2

Traditional Approach: 


  1. An analogue pressure gauge is also included with Blood Pressure kit. This can be attached to the cuff instead of the Blood Pressure sensor. By using an additional Stethoscope (product code 3178) and listening for the Korotkoff sounds whilst deflating the cuff, blood pressure values can be determined.  You can use the data from the Blood Pressure sensor to confirm the auditory signal. This is how a doctor traditionally performs blood pressure readings if not using an automated system.  
  2. This approach just requires a graph.  
  3. EasySense2 will default the recording setup to an interval of 50ms and Continuous Mode. For this experiment it is best to change the sampling interval to 10ms although it will still work at the 50ms default. 
  4. Start recording in EasySense2. 
  5. Pump up the cuff (approximately one to two big pumps per second) until the cuff pressure is approximately 170 to 180mmHg. The cuff pressure is shown on the graph and the number box on the far righthand side of EasySense2. 
  6. Slowly open the valve to decrease the cuff pressure. This will require a very small turn of the valve in the region of 5 to 10 degrees. The cuff should deflate at a rate of 5 to 10mmHg every 5 seconds or so. 
  7. The experiment will automatically end once the cuff pressure gets to below 35mmHg. Results similar to those below will be recorded: